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5 Key Takeaways – Improved Route 6/10 Corridor Plan

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  1. Great example of city, state collaborating on a complex challenge and finding the win-win.
  2. Winning redesign will serve local residents and regional commuters well for many years to come.
  3. Reconnected street grid with new bike & ped connections will help to revitalize corridor neighborhoods.
  4. Up to 30 acres of land to eventually be freed up for community and economic development.
  5. An example of the positive impact of Grow Smart RI’s brand of thoughtful advocacy and consensus building.

 

Grow Smart RI is proud that Governor Raimondo asked that we play a leadership role in helping to facilitate a winning redesign for the crumbling Route 6/10 Corridor.   We also worked in close partnership with other members of the Fixthe610 Coalition that studied all aspects of various design concepts with an eye toward positive long-term community and economic outcomes for the estimated $400 million investment to replace this aging infrastructure.

We praise the Governor for her leadership and her willingness to listen when we requested a more innovative neighborhood and economic-friendly approach to the 6/10 corridor design.   And we thank Providence Mayor Jorge Elorza for his determination to achieve an outcome that will better serve nearby residents and the regional economy for many years.  Through the efforts of the Mayor, his staff and transportation consultants and engineers working in collaboration with RIDOT, a win-win design was conceived and adjusted that effectively balances travel demand with neighborhood scale improvements and new (re)development opportunities – and still within budget.

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3 Responses to 5 Key Takeaways – Improved Route 6/10 Corridor Plan

  1. Michael Targeel December 13, 2016 at 12:05 am #

    The latest scheme will be far better than what is there, but a cap over the highway at least between Westminster St. and Broadway is warranted. The State should solucit air rights development at that location, including a green space/plaza that a revenue generating development would sustain. This new plan falls short. The moment demands a restoration of the physical topography that once made Olneyville whole. We’re not talking Boston’s depressed Central Artery here ($$$), but a small gap in an otherwise extensive system of urban disruption.
    Again, it’s a positive step, but it won’t reach the standard we should set for the project, IMO.

    • Michael Tarheel December 13, 2016 at 12:09 am #

      Damn spell-check .
      Here: =)
      The latest scheme will be far better than what is there, but a cap over the highway at least between Westminster St. and Broadway is warranted. The State should solicit air rights development at that location, including a green space/plaza that a revenue generating development would sustain. This new plan falls short. The moment demands a restoration of the physical topography that once made Olneyville whole. We’re not talking Boston’s depressed Central Artery here ($$$), but a small gap in an otherwise extensive system of urban disruption.
      Again, it’s a positive step, but it won’t reach the standard we should be setting for urban highway replacement, IMO.

      • John Flaherty December 13, 2016 at 1:51 pm #

        Michael, There’s no question that with unlimited resources we could achieve even more. Given the constraints though, we think the resulting design concept is a winner.